January 2014

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2013: year in review

Manvel EMS to sponsor CERT training

Alvin schools meet standards

Manvel Police Activity Report

City to change school zone times

Manvel Barber Shop on local news station

City one step closer to recycling program

Plat for storage facility approved

Manvel Police Report - Jan 26

 

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2013: year in review

January 1, 2014

 

2013 began with Manvel City Manager Kyle Jung sorting through 87 resumes submitted for the chief of police position that became available after long-time Chief Ralph Garcia was terminated. Sergeant Art Chapa served as interim chief until Keith Traylor was sworn in in April. Some on council favored Chapa be appointed to the position but Jung explained that Chapa was not given consideration because he did not meet the duties, skills, and knowledge that were included in the job announcement. Jung felt the city required a candidate “with at least five years of upper management experience in municipal law enforcement, direct experience working in a growing municipal police department, and completion of advanced management training.” Jung went on to say that he believes “Keith Traylor is well suited to meet these requirements and provide the leadership the Manvel police department needs in the future.” Chapa ultimately left the department for other opportunities.

City council rewarded the city manager after one year on the job with a monthly raise of $2,000. Council member John Cox voted against the raise explaining he he felt the city was not in a position to afford the increased compensation package. Cox said he had “no problem giving the man a raise, but I just don’t think this was the time to do it.”

The issue of employee compensation was debated again later in the year as part of the fiscal year 2014 budget negotiations. The initial budget would have required a tax hike but council was unanimous in its decision to hold the line on taxes. A significant part of the budget provided for salary increases for most all city employees. City controller Phyllis Herbst said “for years our staff has gone without raises, either no raise at all or very small. And they are hired on at a very low pay. We are starting to have turnover. We are starting to have employees needing to go somewhere else in this economy.” Ultimately most every city employee did receive a raise in the new budget. Jung explained the new pay rates would bring them into line with comparable positions in neighboring cities. The 2014 budget does realize additional revenue due to a larger tax base and increased property values in the city. Revenue available for the 2105 budget should see a significant increase as new homes from Lakeland will be added to the tax rolls.

City council considered implementing a recycling program for the city after hearing a presentation that explained the facilities are now available to more efficiently process recyclable material allowing for a streamlined collection process and a reduction in costs. The cost of a new program was explained to be no more than is presently paid as the pick-up process and frequency would remain the same. Council was strongly in favor of beginning a program but nothing more was ever presented for their consideration.

In February, council authorized the purchase of approximately 108 acres on CR 58 (Croix Road) for $2,160,000, to be paid through a Certificate of Obligation owed over 20 years. Possible uses of the property include as detention for storm water, storage of surface water, a possible location of a surface water treatment plant, storage of water from the Gulf Coast Water Authority, and/or a city recreational facility.

In March candidates were set for the election to be held in May. Melody Hanson sought her fourth term as a member of City Council and was unopposed. Hanson is the senior member on council and serves as Mayor Pro-tem. The other race saw incumbent Lew Shuffler challenged by former council member Gary Garnett, who said he wanted to once more involve himself in city affairs. He expressed an intent at that time to challenge Mayor Delores Martin in 2014. Shuffler ultimately won re-election to a second term.

In April council heard an earful from residents of the Rodeo Palms subdivision resulting from an announcement to build a 200 home community consisting solely of rental properties. One six year resident expressed the feeling of many when she opined that a high density of rentals draws the criminal element. She also expressed angst at the likelihood of reduced property values. She said if the situation were to get out of control that she would be forced to move and would discourage others considering moving to the area. City Manager Kyle Jung made clear that the city council would not approve or disapprove the plan. “It has already been platted, Legend already owns the property, and they can build the houses whenever they want to; there is nothing the city can do,” he said.

Ultimately residents earned a reprieve as council issued a moratorium on building permits for the subdivision resulting from continual problems with sufficient water being available to the development. In December 2013, however, council was satisfied by MUD 29 officials that sufficient capacity is available to meet the new construction without compromise to existing system users. The attorney for MUD 29 said he feels the MUD is well capable of sufficient service saying “this is becoming one of the most redundant systems I ever heard of. There are a lot of different places for us to get water.” He said “people out there are not just concerned about their water, they want their tax rates to be reasonable, and that simply is not going to happen without a construction program.” Thirty-two connections are expected to be requested and a connection with a neighboring private water company will provide water on an interim basis sufficient to serve 100 additional connections. Rodeo Palms residents were assessed a tax increase to fund the cost of a new well that is currently under construction and slated to be on-line late in 2014.

In June council approved the implementation of a Water/Wastewater Impact Fee to be placed on new home construction and on current homeowners who opt in to the city’s system. Impact Fees allow a city to charge developers for some of the costs that new development places on its infrastructure and resources.” The impact fee will be $2,400 per connection and is separate and apart from the meter and tap fee the city charges users connecting to the system. Considerable discussion by council yielded a plan for current homeowners that offers a one year waiver of the fee with a second year at 50%.

Council authorized the preparation of a high level Master Drainage Plan for the city that would provide a sub-regional detention pond design that would reduce the cost impact of drainage improvements by allowing future developments the possibility of sharing master planned detention facilities. It also will provide recommendations for the improvements in order to meet the city’s growth and future needs. Mayor Delores Martin told council that the Plan would “be another important tool for us to use in the city’s Comprehensive Plan.”

In August a joint workshop was held with members of Manvel City Council and PD&Z to hear from the Alvin Independent School District on the progress and planning of the proposed Manvel Junior High School to be constructed behind the current Manvel High School. The meeting resulted in a series of accusations between the two entities as Mayor Martin characterized the meeting as “productive in that the council was able to voice their concerns on areas to be addressed” and saying “dialogue and clarification are healthy.” AISD characterized it differently, expressing a feeling of being “mbushed” and feeling “set-up.” Other than the recurring dysfunctional relationship that exists between Manvel and AISD, the primary issue of concern expressed by council members was the traffic impact the new school would have on the Hwy 6/McCoy Road intersection. AISD vows to do whatever can be done to mitigate those concerns and construction plans are expected to be granted and construction commenced in the first quarter of 2014. The new school is projected to be available for students beginning the 2015-2016 school year.

In December council authorized the acquisition of an easement to be utilized for the water/wastewater utilities planned for state highway 6 to state hwy 288. Efforts have been on-going for many months to finalize the necessary easements that will allow the construction of the utilities to commence. Manvel’s Economic Development Corporation (MEDC) agreed to underwrite the cost more than a year ago. The completion of the infrastructure is critical for the city to realize meaningful development along Hwy 6.

And finally in December, Council approved numerous plats that pave the way for the new Pomona Development to move forward. Plans provide for an eventual 2100 lots, high density residential, and possible retail/mixed-use commercial areas. The developer claims a ground breaking in the summer of 2014 with the first homes being occupied in early 2015.

 

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Manvel EMS to sponsor CERT training

January 8, 2014

 

Beginning January 9, the Homeland Preparedness Project will conduct an eight-week class in emergency response training at the Manvel EMS station on Masters Road.  The program consists of 24 hours of initial training and is free to participants.  A program certified by FEMA and gaining national importance known as CERT (Community Emergency Response Team) will present a myriad of topics on personal and family preparedness for natural disasters and potential acts of terrorism.  According to the program flyer, “When you are trained, you are far better equipped to deal with your circumstance without needing aid from outside sources.”

 

The FEMA website describes the CERT program: “The Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) Program educates people about disaster preparedness for hazards that may impact their area and trains them in basic disaster response skills, such as fire safety, light search and rescue, team organization, and disaster medical operations. Using the training learned in the classroom and during exercises, CERT members can assist others in their neighborhood or workplace following an event when professional responders are not immediately available to help. CERT members also are encouraged to support emergency response agencies by taking a more active role in emergency preparedness projects in their community.”

 

The website also explains the benefit to the community: “People who go through CERT training have a better understanding of the potential threats to their home, workplace and community and can take the right steps to lessen the effects of these hazards on themselves, their homes or workplace. If a disaster happens that overwhelms local response capability, CERT members can apply the training learned in the classroom and during exercises to give critical support to their family, loved ones, neighbors or associates in their immediate area until help arrives. When help does arrive, CERTs provide useful information to responders and support their efforts, as directed, at the disaster site. CERT members can also assist with non-emergency projects that improve the safety of the community. CERTs have been used to distribute and/or install smoke alarms, replace smoke alarm batteries in the home of elderly, distribute disaster education material, provide services at special events, such as parades, sporting events, concerts and more.”

 

A CERT program was attempted once before for Manvel citizens in 2012.  Mayor Delores Martin said that past effort by Manvel EMS to start the citizen program was unsuccessful as it required a minimum number of people to commit to the ten-week training program.  Only the mayor, city secretary, and the city’s fire marshal signed up.  Martin claimed that the EMS would do it again if the minimum number of people would commit to the program.

 

Manvel city council member Lew Shuffler breathed new life into the effort last July when he suggested the city establish a local CERT program.  He said then that Brazoria County has a CERT program, as does Pearland and Alvin.  In promoting the new effort, Shuffler said the following:  “As we all know, and as many of us have experienced, an event can occur that changes our way of life in an instant.  Although we may not be able to prevent such events from happening, often times we can help reduce the impact if we know how to prepare and how to respond when they occur.   In the initial minutes or hours of a disaster, before the professional first responders have time to arrive, a properly trained lay person can make a difference.  CERT members can give critical support to first responders, provide immediate assistance to victims, and organize spontaneous volunteers at a disaster site.  CERT members can also help with non-emergency projects that help improve the safety of the community.”

 

Admitting that he would not know where to begin to respond to a major disaster or how to safely and properly help himself or others in the community, he “believes our city will be stronger and safer if there is a team of properly trained citizens in place ready to respond in a professional and organized manner should it become necessary.  I would like to invite those willing to “make a difference” to take the next step by joining my wife, Mary Anne, and me on Thursday evenings beginning January 9th through February 27th (6:30pm – 9:30pm) to participate in the Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) training.   We need at least 15 people to sign up for training so your participation is vital!”

 

Training will be conducted by the Homeland Preparedness Project, which was formed in 2004 when various government agencies and local citizens expressed interest “in improving the level of preparedness in their communities.  Recognizing a serious need, the founders of Homeland Preparedness Project came together to form a non-profit organization that could provide tools to create a safer community at no cost to the jurisdiction.”

 

Manvel’s Director of Emergency Medical Services (EMS), Dave Ferguson, is a strong proponent of the training and is making the training room at the EMS station available free of charge as a community service.  The CERT basic course is composed of nine units taught by one or more instructors certified in the CERT curriculum.  Each unit is taught by professional responders or other experts in the field addressed by the unit which provides continuity and helps ensure that the training is successful.  According to FEMA, “CERT training teaches skills that people can use to safely help while waiting for responders. The alternate is to do nothing and that is not in our nature.”

 

The training will consist of eight three-hour sessions at the Manvel EMS station located at 6931 Masters Road (next to the Post Office) on Thursday nights beginning January 9.  The program will run through February 27.  The time of the sessions is 6:30 to 9:30 PM.  Additional information on the CERT program can be found on the FEMA website (www.fema.gov) and the Homeland Preparedness Project (www.homelandprepraredness.org).

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Alvin schools meet standards

January 15, 2014

 

The Texas Education Agency released a list of 829 schools last week that failed to meet minimum state standards, a number nearly twofold from the year before. The Alvin Independent School District (AISD) saw no campuses on the list.

Superintendent of schools for AISD, Dr. Fred Brent, responded to the report: “I am extremely proud of the way our teachers meet the needs of our students on a daily basis. Certainly, I am appreciative that none of our schools are on the list of failing schools; however, these measures are solely based on standardized tests. Alvin ISD is motivated by a continued pursuit of providing students with engaging work that is authentic and rigorous while not being solely driven by standardized state tests.”

To be put on the list a school must see more than half their students fail the state accountability test. Standards were changed last August and now include not only test scores but also subjective measures such as overall student progress from prior years, an improved performance from disadvantaged students, and how prepared graduating students are for college or a job.

Superintendent Brent feels AISD’s approach to education is returning dividends. He explains the goal of developing lessons and work for students: “We strive to incorporate design qualities that allow us to move from a teaching platform to a learning platform. We do this by providing our students with tasks that include a clear product focus built on meaningful academic content. We believe that by incorporating elements of choice, novelty and affiliation, students will find meaning and purpose in the work they do. We believe that these qualities drive adults to become passionate and innovate in their careers and we strive to provide our students with similar opportunities in a safe classroom environment.”

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Manvel Police Activity Report

January 15. 2014

 

Manvel Police responded to a missing persons report at 6900 Lewis Lane on January 8. The mother of the missing person reported her son, who has a history of suicidal tendencies, had gone missing December 30 in his company truck. As of this writing the man remains unfound.

Police referred a possible sexual assault in the 19000 block of Morris Avenue of two minor girls, aged 7 and 9, to Children’s Protective Service. A neighbor reported the accusation and according to reports the incident was more “grabbing and touching” than an actual sexual assault. Police found no criminal offense occurred and recommended the matter to CPS.

A 29-year old woman attempted to forge a check in the amount of more than $800 drawn from an account belonging to a 63-year old Manvel man. Police reported no relationship between the parties and speculated it was a case of identity theft and the attempt to pass a fraudulent check likely printed on a computer. The matter remains under investigation.

A Rodeo Palms resident on San Simeon Drive reported a theft of a UPS package outside their front door on January 10. A witness saw the perpetrator and reported the incident to police. The theft was recorded on a video camera that showed the doer exiting his vehicle, running to the door, stealing the package and driving away. The event required no more than one minute. Police indicate this type of theft is “happening all the time.”

And on January 12 police responded to assist an EMS call on Mira Loma regarding an unconscious 87-year old male in full arrest. CPR was attempted but resulted in a negative outcome. The man was pronounced dead at the scene. Reports indicate the man was to begin hospice care the day following his death.

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City to change school zone times

January 15, 2014

 

Manvel residents will soon see amended school zone times in the city. Member Larry Akery requested council consider a change after hearing from several citizens on the matter. Specifically he requested changing the evening time from 5PM to 4PM, which he considered more reasonable, and perhaps eliminating the zone on Cemetery Road altogether. Presently the city has one school zone time for all three campuses even though they have staggered start times and are not in close proximity to each other.

Member Melody Hanson was the only council member serving when the present times were decided some five years back. She recalled council wanted to come up with a uniform school zone time to be simple for drivers to remember. But Hanson feels now that “the schools are so far apart that it doesn’t make sense when Rodeo Palms is in session that someone over near the high school or elementary school should be driving 20 miles per hour. Hanson was in favor of addressing the matter saying “it just bogs everything down.” She favors implementing three separate times around the individual school “that the child is getting in or out of at that time.”

Mayor Delores Martin recalled the thinking at the time was “if we put up three separate school zones we would be a ticket monger, or trying to catch people as they changed from one school to the other.” But now with the junior high school no longer in operation at Lewis Lane and the elementary school set a good distance back from Hwy 6 that Martin feels it is no longer necessary to have a unified time.

City Manager Kyle Jung recommended two zones, one for EC Mason Elementary and another for the junior high and high school. He reminded council that a new junior high will be opening behind Manvel High School in August 2015 and that it should be taken into account now so that the time would not have to be amended again when the school begins operation next year. Jung also condoned the elimination of the zone along Cemetery Road. EC Mason would see zones between 7 and 9 AM and 2:30 to 4 PM. The junior high and high school zones would end ½ hour sooner in the afternoons at 4:30 PM.

Council ultimately agreed to eliminate the Cemetery Road zone and to amend the school zone times as follows: EC Mason Elementary from 7 to 9 AM and 2:30 to 4 PM, Rodeo Palms Junior High from 8-9 AM and 2:30 to 4:30 PM, and Manvel High School from 6:30 to 9 AM and 2:30 to 4:30 PM. The new times will go into effect once new signage is able to be installed.

In other council news, the city’s Code of Ordinances was amended to prohibit saltwater, injection, and disposal wells from being located within the city limits or the city’s extra territorial jurisdiction (ETJ). The purpose of the change is to protect the water supply serving city residents. Mayor Martin said “water is out lifeline and any contamination that is put below the ground can ruin our supply.” The amendment was unanimously approved.

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Manvel Barber Shop on local news station

January 22, 2014

 

The Manvel Barber Shop at 20226 Hwy 6 at Russel Road was featured on Houston’s Channel 13 newscast last week. According to Steve Moore, owner of the shop, the television station dispatched a reporter at the suggestion of a customer that was impressed sufficiently on his first visit with the feel of an old-time barber shop. Walking through the door customers experience barber fixtures and equipment from the past with perhaps the most notable item a large antique brass cash register that Moore says will ring up a maximum sale of $5.99. In a glass display case the register sets on are numerous old-fashioned styling utensils such as razors, scissors, and the like. Moore also has displayed around the shop numerous fishing rods and reels that further heighten the small town feel. It is the look Moore wanted to capture when he set up the shop in January 1997.

Moore’s longtime partner and friend, John Cox remembered the man who recommended the story, saying he “just loved the atmosphere of the place and the way Steve and I carried on bad-mouthing each other.” Moore added that the man described it as stepping back in time which turned out to be the title Channel 13 gave the feature when airing it on their local newscast.

The reporter spent some five hours at the shop shooting lots of video that eventually was edited down to the just under three minute feature story. Cox said he tried to plug some local businesses and the fact that he himself is a current city council member. Not so much that he cared to push himself as a “politician” but because he recalled small town barber shops as a boy and young man that frequently saw local politicians doing their thing with the local businessmen who liked to congregate and talk over things that men like to talk about. Cox tried to steer the reporter to make some mention of that part of the story which he thought would add to the old small-town feel she wanted to capture. The editing process ended up discarding that part of the story, however.

Cox has been a barber since 1967 but strayed away from it as he enjoyed a long career with Ron Carter’s automobile business in Alvin. Upon his semi-retirement from the car business he helped his wife, who owned an embroidery business in the same center as the barber shop. That is where Moore met Cox and they became friends and eventual business partners. Moore said “his wife talked me into it; she didn’t want him hanging around her shop! I felt sorry for him,” he joked good naturedly, as is a customary thing patrons are entertained with upon a visit the shop. For his part, Moore began the business with a cousin who had just graduated from Beauty College. That did not work out, as Moore describes it “she really didn’t want to work full time. She wanted to be able to take off whenever she wanted.” John kidded in response, “like me.”

Moore describes his collection of old things barber related: “I was single for a lot of years and didn’t have anything to do on weekends and I would get in my car and make like a 300-mile radius, stopping in little town antique shops. That was my weekend event.” His collection of fishing rods and reels came along later on, he explained. “When I got married and had the two 7-year old boys I started taking them fishing and before long I started cleaning reels for people who would bring them in and give them to me. It eventually turned into a hobby. A lot of my rods and reels have never been used and probably never will but I do have about two hundred rods.”

Patrons truly can step back in time and take in the old-time atmosphere and friendly banter among Steve and John and the many regulars of which most are long-time neighbors. The Manvel Barber Shop is open Tuesday through Saturday. Standard men’s cuts are priced at $13. The phone number is (281) 489-3899.

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City one step closer to recycling program

January 29, 2014

 

Manvel citizens are expected to see revised garbage services beginning in April this year that will include curbside recyclable pickup in addition to regular trash.

Manvel city council approved the first reading of a new ordinance that adopts new provisions pertaining to the collection of solid waste. A second reading will be considered for approval at the next council meeting scheduled for February 10. If that reading earns approval as well, which is likely, council will then authorize a resolution granting an exclusive franchise agreement for the collection, hauling, and disposal of municipal waste and construction and demolition waste in the City of Manvel between the city and Progressive Waste Solutions (PWS).

PWS already manages the city’s waste with twice weekly garbage pick-up on Tuesday and Friday. The new service will continue to pick up on the same days with Tuesday being trash day and Friday being recycle day. Customers will be issued two large trash cans, one green for regular trash and one blue for recyclable items. A spokesman for PWS explained that recycling is far less burdensome today than it once was and that customers no longer are required to sort recyclable items before making them eligible for pick-up. With few exceptions most all glass, plastic, metal, and paper can be thrown all together in the blue can. Experience in other communities supports the expectation that the amount of recyclable items will be of a sufficient amount that once weekly garbage pickup will be sufficient.

Member John Cox is not so sure, though. Admittedly not into recycling, Cox said he took a list of acceptable recyclable items that shows some form of number that tells a consumer if the item is recyclable. He said he compared numerous items at his home and place of business with the list and found “half the plastic in my house was not recyclable. I’m not going to sit there and sort plastic bottles and cans and boxes and paper; I’m putting it in my trash compactor.”

Member Adrian Gaspar asked council to consider providing an option for citizens who may not want to recycle for whatever reason by giving them two green cans rather than one green and one blue. Garbage would still be collected only on Tuesday but with two cans the customer should maintain equitable capacity to current services. Gaspar said he is not against recycling and intends to participate in the recycling program. “The thing is, we shouldn’t impose it on everybody,” he said. He believes if someone just doesn’t want to deal with it they shouldn’t be made to.

Member Larry Akery raised the question of what will be done if instead of the company issued cans being placed curbside for pickup a customer places regular trash cans. A PWS spokesman replied that only the company issued cans will be handled by their trucks.

PWS requires thirty to sixty days once the new Franchise Agreement is in place to get the cans ordered and delivered to customers. If the required approvals and authorizations stay on schedule, citizens will see the new system in operation sometime between mid-March and mid-April.

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Plat for storage facility approved

January 29, 2014

 

Manvel city council approved a final plat for a 3.43 acre tract of land located on County Road 59 immediately east of the new elementary school #15 currently under construction for the Alvin Independent School District. The tract is about ¼ mile west of State Highway 288. Plans for the tract call for a single story storage facility containing approximately 80,000 square feet.

Fire Marshall Aaron Bell explained that two of the four buildings will be sprinkled in meeting the city ordinance required in structures greater than 10,000 square feet. Two other buildings fall under the size requirement and will not be sprinkled. Bell also told council that the facility will include a two-bedroom apartment on site for the resident manager to live in.

Mayor Delores Martin announced that the developer had considered the facility before but decided at that time it was too expensive to sprinkle the buildings. “But they gave it some more thought and came back and said yes, we will follow your rules,” she said. The city will receive sales taxes earned from the facility but not ad-valorem taxes.

The property is within the city’s Extra-territorial Jurisdiction (ETJ) but not in the city limits so no zoning ordinance applies. Some on council scoffed at the facility bordering residential areas while others consider it a benefit to the subdivisions. As member Adrian Gaspar phrased it, “Where do you want the people to store their stuff?” Mayor Martin added “you’ve got all those subdivisions and people are looking for a nice place to store their equipment. It is a good idea to meet the needs of our citizens.”

No estimate of when ground breaking will commence or of a completion date was provided.

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Manvel Police Report - Jan 26

 

Manvel Chief of Police Keith Traylor called this last week “kind of crazy and I hope it starts getting a little more calm, but we were extremely busy on a bunch of different crazy stuff.

On January 21, Manvel PD was called to a possible assault with bodily injury between a husband and wife. Upon reaching the scene, officers were told that neither party desired to press charges.

On January 23 in the early morning hours a crash of a vehicle was reported on South Masters near Uzell Rd. A juvenile driver ran off the road and into the ditch. When officers arrived it was determined that the 15 year old was wanted in Alvin. The teen fled the scene and remained uncaptured until the following day when officers arrested him just blocks away from the crash site. He was charged with two counts of fleeing and unauthorized use of a vehicle.

Also on January 23, police responded to a reported burglary of a business. The property owner claimed to see a robber upon entering their place of business and threatened them with a gun. Further investigation by the officer determined the complaint was “unfounded” due to the individual(s) were hallucinating. A video camera was on site and operating and served to disprove their accusations.

Late on January 24 an officer responded to a call heading on South Masters to assist another officer with an intoxicated driver. “As he was taking the curve he hit the loose gravel that was put down for the control of the ice on the drainage bridge and he went sideways and ran the car into the ditch.” It was one of the older cruisers in the fleet and experienced some damage to the undercarriage and the back right quarter. Chief Traylor expects the vehicle to be totaled and will require replacement.

On Saturday the 25th a vehicle was heading northbound on the 288 feeder road at Hwy 6 when another vehicle attempted to take the same lane. “One of them didn’t give way and the other one went into the median and spun his car around in the right-of-way. The other guy pulled off on the side of the road, got out to look for damage to his car, then just drove off.”

On Sunday the 26th, officers responded to an assault with bodily injury that remains under investigation. According to the report, “A husband and wife got into an argument. The wife claims she was beat up, the husband claimed the wife beat him up, the only injuries were to the husband, the wife wants to file charges and the husband doesn’t.” Chief Traylor described it as basically a husband and wife squabble.

Also on the 26th , “Some individuals met up with a Pearland man to buy a gaming station from one of the internet selling sites. The group that was buying the gaming station paid with counterfeit $100 bills. When the person who sold the station found out they chased these other guys to get their property back and during the middle of it they were playing road tag with each other with their cars and one lost control and rolled the vehicle on the side of 288.” One occupant was ejected from the vehicle and life flighted to the hospital. Two passengers in the car were transported to the hospital by ambulance.

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